Best social media image sizes — cheat sheet

Best social media image sizes — cheat sheet

Every social media platform requires different sized photos and different sizes for different purposes. Here’s a convenient reference.┬áBe aware that images will render differently on desktops and mobile phones. Be sure to check your final uploaded images on both desktop and mobile.

Facebook cover image: 851 x 315

Facebook profile image: 170 x 170

Twitter cover image: 1500 x 500

Twitter profile image: 400 x 400

 

Using Custom Audiences in Facebook and Tailored Audiences in Twitter

Using Custom Audiences in Facebook and Tailored Audiences in Twitter

Facebook and Twitter both offer the ability to create custom audiences; Twitter calls them tailored audiences.

This option is useful if you would like to target certain people or exclude them from a social media campaign. Some examples:

  1. Upload your email list to Facebook and/or Twitter. Save it as a custom audience. You could then target a social media campaign to this audience, to reinforce an important message to an already loyal group.
  2. You could exclude people from a particular list from an ad campaign. For example, let’s say you already know who has taken advantage of a particular offer and is thus ineligible to take the same offer again. It makes sense to save yourself ad dollars in targeting these people. Just exclude them.
  3. You can target, or exclude, people who have visited your website. Let’s say you’d like people to sign up for your event. Lots of people are visiting your site but don’t actually sign up. You can track this and then target this people with a social media campaign.

It is important to note that if your email list is small — fewer than a few thousand — you will be able to use the list for targeting in Facebook and Twitter.

Upload email contacts to Facebook, and gain valuable insights

Upload email contacts to Facebook, and gain valuable insights

It’s easy to upload your email contact list to your Facebook fan page, but then what do you do with this new audience you’ve created?

For starters, you may simply find the information interesting. I recently uploaded a list for a client and we discovered that most of our list could be found on Facebook but, of those, only about one-quarter were following our Facebook page. Surely, there must be low-hanging fruit there?

So, we ran a small campaign targeted at this list of people who were signed up for our emails but not Facebook fans. The campaign yielded interesting results. Only a small percentage of this audience ultimately liked our Facebook page, but our acquisition cost was low, relative to similar campaigns.

The experiment may me wonder if our list has some weak links and that we may want to consider doing a clean-up. After all, if an email subscriber cannot be encouraged to like our Facebook page, they are probably unlikely to engage with us in more meaningful ways.

The value of consistent messaging

The value of consistent messaging

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A new client recently asked me to review their communications strategy.

At the time, their big push was a food drive at a local event. They wanted to fill a food pantry as well as raise awareness in the community. They were using email marketing, online advertising, traditional local print ads, and local PR. These were great ways to get the word out to the right audience. But then their strategy went off the rails.

Their emails and ads all had different calls to action. Some said, “Donate.” Others said, “Give.” Still others: “Make a difference.” Most people need to hear the same message seven times before they remember it, and if that message is not consistent, it will not stick. Decide on an effective call to action and then stick with it. Repeat it over and over, in a variety of channels. Let the message come from different places, but the message itself should always be the same.

This consistency needs to carry through to your visuals as well. If your email is linking to a web page, be sure that the email and the web page have a consistent look. The person needs immediate reassurance that they’ve arrived in the right place. Colors, visuals, and mood should all support your messaging and your call to action.

 

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Facebook income targeting: how accurate is it, and does it work?

Facebook income targeting: how accurate is it, and does it work?

Jennifer Lawrence stars as 'Katniss Everdeen' in THE HUNGER GAMES.

It’s tempting to target ads based on income. After all, if you are selling high-end items, you may want to pursue those with the means directly. I have never trusted this data and believe I have now confirmed my cynicism here.

I always suspected that users would not volunteer this info and, in fact, they don’t. According to Facebook: “Income is either consumer self-reported through a survey or estimated based on a variety of demographic data such as age, occupation, home ownership, and a median income for the local area., provided by Acxiom.” Is the data they cull accurate? It’s impossible to know.

However, a client of mine recently ran some ads which targeted high income individuals specifically. I have never seen ads perform so poorly.

So I don’t know if the income data Facebook possesses is accurate. I do, however, have preliminary proof that this type of targeting does not work well. I would much rather use a lookalike audience to reach new potential customers.